3 Ways to Get Slugs Out of Your Garden

3 Ways to Get Slugs Out of Your Garden

Trouble with slugs in your garden? Don’t worry too much about it. You can absolutely get rid of them in just couple of days. Just try these efficient methods below to help you!

First of all, look for slugs in your garden either in the morning or evening. If you happen to spot some, pick them up and put them in a barrel filled with soapy water. This is one of the best ways to drive the slugs away from your home garden.

The second tip is to prepare a wet cardboard and place it in the center of your garden. Slugs like it when the area is sloppy, so they will always gather on the wet cardboard—making the job much easier for you.

Covering your plants with some glass jars is another smart thing to do. This serves as extra protection that will stop slugs from destroying your wonderful garden.

Follow these simple tips now and your homegrown plants will surely be safe from slug devastation. Feel free to share your own slug elimination tips by leaving a comment below!


3 Ways to Get Slugs Out of Your Garden

1. Check Your Garden for Slugs Every Day
Ideally, check first thing in the morning (while slugs are still active) or at night using a flashlight or a headlamp. During the day, slugs hide out under topsoil and debris, so they are harder to find.

So what do you do when you find them? Hand-pick those buggers! Drop them in a bucket of soapy water or, if you’re a backyard chicken keeper, feed them to your chickens. Hand-picking slugs off of your plants is gross… But it’s worth it because this is the single best deterrent for keeping slugs out of your garden.

Do this every day and you’ll have happier plants with significantly less munch marks.

2. Trick Slugs at Their Own Game
Take a small (about six inches square) piece of cardboard and get it wet, then place it in the middle of your garden. Slugs love this dark, soggy environment and they should congregate there overnight. The next morning, flip over your cardboard and get rid of the slugs you caught.

3. Give Your Tiny Plants Some Protection
Once your plants are bigger and more established, they can tolerate a little munching from slugs. Young plants are really vulnerable, though. Protect your young plants by placing wide-mouth mason jars over them. This will create a physical barrier that the slugs can’t get passed.

Just remember to remove the jars if it’s a hot, sunny day, otherwise your plants will cook. You’ll also need to take the jars off when the plants start to outgrow them, but this will give your seedlings a good, protected start.

Article Source: backyardroots.com

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